Saturday, 7 July 2012

Islam design tartan unveiled is far from representative. Islam and Muslims are not a monolith.

My view: But is 'Islam' a culture? In the same way that we can talk about our Scottish culture? If so, which Islam?  Which 'Islamic' country does this tartan represent in terms of all the Muslims in diaspora who live in Scotland?   Then this raises the question about whose Islam?  Is this a Shi'a, Sunni, Ahmadi, Alawi 'Islam' tartan?  Muslims are not a monolith and nor is 'Islam' --- this is certainly not a progressive move.
(UKPA) – 19 hours ago 
A tartan celebrating ties between Scotland and Islam has been created.

The official design incorporates five colours to reflect the Scottish flag and elements of the faith, including five white lines for the pillars of Islam.

Dr Azeem Ibrahim, from Glasgow, consulted tartan designers and Islamic scholars to produce the design.

It is intended to "weave the diverse Muslim identity into the fabric of Scotland", its creator said.  The design will be shown off by politicians at Glasgow City Chambers.  They include SNP MSP Humza Yousaf and deputy Scottish Labour leader Anas Sarwar MP.  The tartan incorporates blue for the Saltire, green for the colour of Islam, white lines for the five pillars of Islam, six gold lines for the articles of faith and a black square pattern representing the Holy Kabah.

It was milled at DC Dalgleish, of Selkirk, using original production methods on traditional shuttle looms.

Dr Ibrahim recently launched a new think-tank, the Scotland Institute, to look at social issues and the impact of constitutional change.

5 comments:

  1. Salaams. I'm an outsider, so perhaps I'm missing something, but it seems a fine gesture to me. Am curious as to the substance of your objection. Are you saying there needs to be more styles to reflect the diversity of Islam, that Scottish Muslims shouldn't have a separate one, or that there is something non-inclusive about this particular design?

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  2. I am very happy to read this article.Islam in reunion

    Thank


    Sania

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  3. Why are you trying to divide the Muslims in sects and groups when someone is working to unite them and celebrate their commonality - their Scottish identity? We already have too many religious leaders emphasizing differences between us.

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  4. " a black square pattern representing the Holy Kabah."
    Kind of ironic that no non-Muslim Scot is allowed anywhere near it.

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  5. Sounds like a great idea:

    http://scotspolitics.com/opinion-makers/tartan-tie-saves-the-day-for-first-minister

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